FACULTY AUTHORED WORKING PAPER SERIES

November 2011 | Issue 7
Challenges Facing the GHTS in a Post CWB Environment
Murray Fulton, Professor and Graduate Chair, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan Campus

On October 18, 2011 the Government of Canada introduced Bill C-18 to remove the Canadian Wheat Board (CWB) as the sole seller of wheat and barley produced by farmers in Western Canada. On the surface this legislation looks merely to introduce a change in the way that Western Canadian farmers market their grains. Deeper down, however, there is something much more fundamental happening. The changes proposed to the CWB represent a significant regulatory change in which administrative fiat would be replaced by market transactions.

January 2011 | Issue 6
Policies for Economic Development
Rose Olfert, Professor, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan campus; Julio Berdegue, Benjamin Jara and Felix Modrego, RIMSIP, Latin America Center for Rural Development, Santiago Chile 

Policies for economic development are often classified into two main types: People-based policy and Place-based. People-based policies are policies like education and health policies that will improve the well-being and productivity of individuals. In Latin America, Conditional Cash Transfer Programs are peoplebased policies that make cash transfers conditional on school attendance and health-care checkups, covering over 21 million households and 100 million people. Well known examples are the Oportunidades and the Bolsa Familia programs in Mexico and Brazil, respectively. Universal education or child immunization (vaccination) policies are other forms of people-based policies. However, a highly educated and healthy person may re-locate to where they can earn more income or enjoy a higher quality of life following their education. In this case the place that they leave is no better off and may be worse off.

August 2010 | Issue 5
Transnational Actors and Public Policy
Daniel Béland, Canada Research Chair and Professor, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan campus; and Mitchell A. Orenstein, School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)

In contradiction to a number of scholars who have focused mainly on the role of financial loans and material interests to explain policy diffusion and transnational influence, this article argues that ideational processes constitute a key aspect of the impact of transnational actors on country- level policy development. In most cases, transnational policy actors exert policy influence at least in part by taking on the roles of global think tanks and policy entrepreneurs. Recognizing that this ideational influence interacts with other potential causal factors, the article first turns to the literature on ideational processes and public policy before showing how transnational actors play a central role in both the diffusion and the country-level implementation of policy ideas.

July 2010 | Issue 4
Wheat and Trade Policy in the Great Depression*
Gregory P. Marchildon, Canada Research Chair and Professor, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Regina campus

While there is considerable debate concerning the precise definition of globalization, there is consensus that the intensity of commodity trade is one of the principal measures of globalization. Of course, commodity trade does not exist in a vacuum. An increase in the intensity of trade is accompanied by an ever expanding specialization in, and ultimately an integration of, the factors of production of land, labour, and capital. Indeed, for economists and economic historians, globally integrated commodity and factor markets are the very essence of globalization.

June 2010 | Issue 3
Triage at the Periphery: Place-Based Policy in Resource-Dependent Rural Communities
Rose Olfert, Professor, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan campus

The selection of candidates for place-based policy, in a context of limited budgets and the danger of creating adverse incentives, requires first the identification of vulnerable communities and, second, demonstration of the effectiveness of potential interventions. We propose a filtering or ‘triage' process based on both actual performance and empirical estimation. Our first step is the delineation of four community classes that may qualify using actual poverty rates and population growth as indicators of economic performance.

February 2010 | Issue 2
An Integrated Approach to Gender Equality: From Gender-Based Analysis to Gender Mainstreaming
Kathleen McNutt, Assistant Professor, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Regina campus

Gender mainstreaming, a gender equality governance strategy, is performing poorly across governments. While many national and regional governments have adopted gender equality policy tools, developing and implementing an integrated gender mainstreaming strategy requires substantive reforms to existing procedures and institutional structures.

November 2009 | Issue 1
Discrepancies in Corruption Perceptions, or Why is Canada So Corrupt?
Michael M. Atkinson, Executive Director and Professor, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan campus

In 1984 and again in 2006, Canadians went to the polls in the shadow of charges of ethical impropriety. During the years spanning the governments of Brian Mulroney, Jean Chretien and Paul Martin, there were twenty-three episodes in which plausible accusations of ethical breeches were leveled and in several cases sustained. Survey research shows clearly that a large proportion of Canadians see their politicians and their institutions as fundamentally corrupt. Yet international corruption indices place Canada consistently among the lowest ranked countries. Why do Canadians see their country as corrupt, but informed international observers do not? This paper argues that the gap that exists between these two perceptions of reality has its roots in the meanings assigned to the term "corruption."