Picture of  Ramona Kyabaggu

Ramona Kyabaggu PhD (Candidate), MSc, BHSc, CHIM JSGS Faculty, U of R

Assistant Professor, Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Regina

Areas of Interest

  • Health Information Systems
  • Health Information Management

About

Ramona Kyabaggu, MSc, is a Certified Health Information Management (CHIM) professional who graduated from the University of Western Ontario’s honours specialization program in health information management in 2009. Since then, she has worked in public health as a program evaluator and knowledge broker and taught Public Health Informatics at the University of Lusaka, Zambia. Currently, Ramona is a 4th year doctoral candidate in Health Information Science (Western University) and an assistant professor at Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy at the University of Regina, where she coordinates the Master of Health Administration major in Health Informatics and Information Management (MHA-HIIM). Ramona is an applied researcher whose primary research goal is to strengthen health system readiness for learning health systems. Her current research addresses how we can improve health information systems implementation through the better use of theory and evaluation.

Designations

  • PhD (Candidate), Health Information Science, Western University 
  • MSc, Health Services and Public Health Research (Epidemiology), University of Aberdeen, UK
  • BHSc Honours, Health Information Management, Western University
  • CHIM, Certified Health Information Management Professional

Recent Grants/Awards

Grants

  • Principal Investigator, Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation, Solutions-Innovation Grant,"Engineering and Evaluating a Patient-oriented Home Care Ordering Tool to Enhance Aging in Place During the COVID Era," $50,000. 2021.

Awards

  • 2018 Global Opportunities Scholarship
  • 2018 Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Scholarship

Select Publications

Journal Articles

  • Jones GT, Kyabaggu R, Marais D and Macfarlane GJ. (2013). Reproducibility of pain manikins: a comparison of paper versus online questionnaires. British Journal of Pain, 7(3): 130-137

Technical Reports