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Olena Kapral

Johnson-Shoyama Students Awarded $20,000 each in scholarships

Two doctoral students, Olena Kapral and Danette Starblanket, from the Johnson-Shoyama School of Public Policy have been awarded scholarships of $20,000 each.

Olena Kapral, PhD candidate, JSGS U of R campus

Two doctoral students, Olena Kapral and Danette Starblanket, from the Johnson-Shoyama School of Public Policy have been awarded scholarships of $20,000 each, to pursue research into health policy in Saskatchewan and the Idle No More movement.

“We’re delighted and proud that both Olena and Danette have been awarded these prestigious scholarships,” says Michael Atkinson, Executive Director of the Johnson-Shoyama School of Public Policy. “Their success exemplifies the top-quality research talent within the school and the lasting impact that their work can have on the community.”

Olena Kapral, a doctoral candidate from the school’s University of Regina campus, has received the Queen Elizabeth II Scholarship. The basis of her research is to develop a comparative case study of the health policy processes in Saskatchewan and Ontario.  This study aims to evaluate the relationship between provincial governments and health profession organizations in the development of health policies related to primary health care (PHC) reform in Saskatchewan and Ontario. 

“There is exceptional research being conducted across Saskatchewan so I feel very honoured and humbled to receive this award,” says Kapral. “It is amazing to be recognized for my hard work but I have to credit the faculty, staff and students at JSGS and the University of Regina for all I’ve achieved.  They’re a constant source of motivation, inspiration, and support that gives me the drive to continue my own research. For that, and so much more, I owe them a debt of gratitude and thanks.”

Danette StarblanketDanette Starblanket, a doctoral student at the school’s University of Saskatchewan campus, has received the Queen Elizabeth II Centennial Aboriginal Scholarship. Her research examines how Idle No More activated the global community to change to the way government deals with First Nations in Canada. It also aims to evaluate how the movement impacted government policy and practice in Canada and, consequently, the governments’ relationships with Aboriginal people, including First Nations officials. 

“The Queen Elizabeth II Centennial Aboriginal Scholarship demonstrates the sincere commitment of the Government of Saskatchewan to ensure First Nations graduate students are supported and encouraged to strive for excellence in their university studies,” Starblanket said.

Both scholarships have been awarded by the Government of Saskatchewan Ministry of Advanced Education.  

 

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For more information, contact:
Erica Schindel, Communications and Marketing Specialist
Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy
University of Saskatchewan
Phone: 306-966-2663

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