March 2022

CSIP Innovation Forum ~ Saskatchewan's Energy Storage Advantage: Compressed Air Energy Storage

Presented by: Brian Brunskill, Saskatchewan Geoscientist

In Saskatchewan, significant investment must be made to replace retiring coal generation by 2030 and to meet future increases in low-carbon electricity demand. We have abundant wind and solar resources that can help meet this demand but large-scale development is challenging because generation from renewables is intermittent. To provide the same reliability as natural gas generation using renewables, utility-scale energy storage is required. Batteries can provide short-term storage services but in Saskatchewan there is another option: our geological advantage supports the building of air batteries that use electricity generated from renewable sources to compress atmospheric air into large, rock-salt caverns in the deep subsurface. Later in the generation cycle this atmospheric air is released as needed to generate electricity. Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) is a mature technology that has been used in Germany since 1978 and in the USA since 1991. The technology is safe, dependable and it produces no toxic waste. Our investigations support the potential use of CAES technology in Saskatchewan.

Date: Thursday, March 10
Time: 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. (CST)
Location: Delivered by Zoom

CSIP Innovation Forum ~ The Power of Stories: Narratives and Information Framing Effects in Food Science Communication

Presented by: Dr. Yang Yang, Assistant Professor, Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy

This research explores information framing effects by comparing the effectiveness of using logical-scientific versus narrative information to communicate with consumers about a new biotechnology application (gene editing). Using data from an online survey of 804 Canadian adults, a discrete choice experiment elicits preferences for diverse novel food attributes and technologies, with respondents randomly assigned to different information conditions. We construct a logical-scientific information condition, written in a scientific style using the passive voice with generalized and impersonal language and attributed to either a government agency or a scientific organization. In contrast, we frame the narrative-style information condition as a story, using a lively and vivid personal style, and attributed to either a science journalist or a consumer blogger. Data are analyzed using multinomial logit and random parameters logit models. We find that the information format (logical-scientific vs. narrative) matters: narratives help reduce negative perceptions regarding agricultural and food technologies. We also examine factors that predispose consumers to seek logical-scientific versus narrative information sources.

Date: Thursday, March 24
Time: 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. (CST)
Location: Delivered by Zoom