We know we have a problem, but what exactly is it? A call for data collection on the Canadian food system in response to COVID-19

By: Peter Phillips, JSGS Distinguished Professor and CSIP Researcher; and Crystal Chan, JSGS MPP student

The following blog post was originally published by the Canadian Science Policy Centre. https://sciencepolicy.ca/news/weknow-we-have-problem-what-exactly-itcall-data-collection-can...

Read more

Knowledge in a blender: Why we're so mixed up about evidence in public policy

By: Peggy Schmeiser, CSIP Associate Director and JSGS Assistant Professor

There is a lot of concern about recent trends that appear to be undermining the perceived role and credibility of science and evidence in policy making processes. Many factors cont...

Read more

Accelerating the pace of local energy innovation in Saskatchewan

By: Martin Boucher, JSGS Faculty Lecturer and CSIP Energy Policy Researcher

Municipalities across Saskatchewan will soon have a decision to make as to whether they support a policy known as Property Assessment Clean Energy (or PACE).

Read more

Are we really at war with COVID-19?

By: Peter W.B. Phillips, JSGS Distinguished Professor and CSIP Researcher

The following blog post was originally published as part of the Canadian Science Policy Centre Editorial Series: Response to COVID-19 Pandemic and its Impacts. https://sciencepolic...

Read more

Big enough questions

By: Peggy Schmeiser, Jennifer Poudrier, Dean Chapman, Anne Ballantyne, Karen Wood, Joelena Leader, University of Saskatchewan

The following blog post was originally published as part of the Canadian Science Policy Centre Editorial Series: Response to COVID-19 Pandemic and its Impacts. https://sciencepolic...

Read more

Sitting on our hands with big data in our pockets

By: Tarun Katapally, Associate Professor, Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy; and Patient- Oriented Research Leader

The following blog post was originally published as part of the Canadian Science Policy Centre Editorial Series: Response to COVID-19 Pandemic and its Impacts. https://sciencepolic...

Read more

The Elephant in the SMR

By: Jeremy Rayner, Director, Centre for the Study of Science and Innovation Policy; Professor, Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy

In a previous blog post on small modular reactors (SMRs) in Saskatchewan, I noted the evidence that SMRs have enormous potential to provide clean energy across a range of applicati...

Read more

Artificial Intelligence and Decision-Making

By: Peter W.B. Phillips, JSGS Distinguished Professor and CSIP Researcher

Artificial intelligence (AI) presents an interesting set of opportunities and challenges for regulatory systems writ large. AI has a spectrum of possible outcomes. Some people thin...

Read more

Multidisciplinary Collaboration and Evidence in Decision-Making

By: Peggy Schmeiser, CSIP Associate Director and JSGS Assistant Professor

The fundamental question in collaborative research is how to construct more inclusive, multidisciplinary teams of individuals who are willing to move beyond their own understanding...

Read more

The Sobering Reality of COVID-19

By: Dan Florizone, Executive-in-Residence, Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy

Canada has entered a sobering COVID-19 reality. Though we had weeks to prepare based on what we were seeing in China, Italy, Iran and other areas, Canada has only begun to put in p...

Read more

Want to #scicomm? First let's show the world what scientists really look like

By: Crystal Chan, Master of Public Policy student, Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan

So, what do scientists do and what do they look like? Well, it is hard to say, but it is definitely not what the internet is telling you.

Read more

From Queen City to Clown City

By: Jeremy Rayner, CSIP Director and JSGS Professor

It’s unclear whether anyone ever said that all publicity is good publicity, but city councilors in Regina have had reason to doubt that maxim after the furour that erupted around t...

Read more